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For Immediate Release
December 8, 2017
Media Contact: Brandon Parker | Communications Manager
Brandon.Parker@nflpa.com | 202-756-9160

 

ARIZONA’S DAVID JOHNSON NAMED WEEK 13 NFLPA COMMUNITY MVP
Cardinals running back launched his new Mission 31 Foundation to support seriously ill children

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – David Johnson has been named Week 13 NFLPA Community MVP after raising nearly $200,000 for his newly formed Mission 31 Foundation, which will provide resources for seriously ill children and their families.

“I am so honored to be named the NFLPA’s Community MVP for Week 13,” Johnson said. “This is only the beginning for Mission 31. My wife and I can’t wait to positively impact the lives of so many children and their families.”

The foundation got off to a strong start on Monday, thanks to the first annual “Mission 31: Possible” fundraising event in Arizona. Johnson was joined by 12 of his Cardinals teammates as they interacted with more than 200 guests while celebrating his new charitable organization. By night’s end, almost $200,000 had been raised, including a $15,000 personal donation by Johnson and his wife, Meghan.

The majority of these proceeds will go toward the formation of DJ’s Lockers early next year. As the foundation’s signature outreach program, DJ’s Lockers are technology centers that will be installed within the pediatric wings of select hospitals, providing electronic entertainment to serve as a diversion for young kids during their treatment and recovery.

While sidelined for most of this season by a wrist injury, Johnson has used that time to pour back into the community. The All-Pro rusher recently finished “Running Through Bullying,” his latest effort to stop bullying in schools. Johnson and his wife judged an essay contest at Sunnyslope Elementary School in north Phoenix, where students submitted entries on how to prevent bullying. The two winners received awards at a school-wide pizza party hosted last week by the Johnsons.

Along with volunteering for the Ronald McDonald House, Boys Hope Girls Hope Arizona, Phoenix Children’s Hospital and Christmas at the Salvation Army, Johnson has actively helped several Cardinal teammates with their own charities. Now, the third-year player is excited to make his own personal impact on those in need through the Mission 31 Foundation.

In honor of Johnson being named this week’s Community MVP, the NFLPA will make a $10,000 contribution to his foundation or charity of choice along with an in-kind donation to him on behalf of our supporting partner Delta Private Jets. Johnson, along with the other 2017 Community MVPs, will also become eligible for this year’s Byron Whizzer White Award, which is the highest honor that the NFLPA can bestow upon a player.

The NFLPA Community MVP program recognizes NFL players who are making a positive impact in their local communities. Each week during the regular season, the NFLPA will celebrate one NFL player* who has demonstrated a commitment to giving back to his community. Please visit our website to read more about the program as well as the current and past winners.

 

*To be eligible for the Community MVP award, a player must be a dues-paying member of the NFLPA and either on a current NFL roster or actively seeking employment as a free agent.

 

2017 Community MVPs:
Week 0: J.J. Watt (Houston Texans)
Week 1: Colin Kaepernick
Week 2: Chris Long (Philadelphia Eagles)

Week 3: Carson Wentz (Philadelphia Eagles)

Week 4: Max Garcia (Denver Broncos)

Week 5: Ha Ha Clinton-Dix (Green Bay Packers)

Week 6: Vic Beasley Jr. (Atlanta Falcons)

Week 7: Travis Frederick (Dallas Cowboys)

Week 8: Andy Dalton (Cincinnati Bengals)

Week 9: Carlos Dunlap (Cincinnati Bengals)

Week 10: Josh Norman (Washington Redskins)

Week 11: Vinny Curry (Philadelphia Eagles)

Week 12: Emmanuel Sanders (Denver Broncos)
 

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About the NFL Players Association:

The National Football League Players Association is the union for professional football players in the National Football League. Established in 1956, the NFLPA has a long history of assuring proper recognition and representation of players’ interests. The NFLPA has shown that it will do whatever is necessary to assure that the rights of players are protected—including ceasing to be a union, if necessary, as it did in 1989. In 1993, the NFLPA again was officially recognized as the union representing the players, and negotiated a landmark Collective Bargaining Agreement with the NFL. The current CBA will govern the sport through 2020. Learn more at www.nflpa.com.

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