Highlights Inside this week's FPN
 
PLAYER NEWS
Mark Clayton is a former player entrepreneur 

The former NFL player speaks on his new Beats rival headphones and how he started his business. View @ the 2:00 mark.
Professional Athlete to Successful Businessman | Israel Idonije

What three lessons were most important that you took from your athletic ability to succeed in business?

Israel Idonije was a professional football player in the NFL for 11 years. He has transformed his football life into a very successful businessman with several diverse companies that he oversees. We ask him the lessons he's learned as an athlete to that he incorporated into business.
 
Professional Athlete to Successful Businessman  | Israel Idonije
2016 CONVENTION PHOTO GALLERY 
To say this year's convention was fun is an understatement! From the excursions, hula lessons, volleyball, basketball, pool and ocean time, and some NFLPA business to our awesome speakers and the final night karaoke show a great time was had by all. Check out the hashtag #NFLPAConvention on Twitter to relive some other cool moments. If you missed out, be on the lookout here for the announcement of the next one in 2017!
Generations: Former players Eddie Khayat and Bernard Robertson, Tulane Alumni
Generations: Current player Kelvin Beachum and former player Albert Reese, SMU Alumni
Generations: Former players Dan Fike and James Harrell, NFLPA's Lorenzo Kaufman, Florida Alumni
Team Wrighster in full effect
Chapter President Joe Wesley proudly displaying his Houston Chapter of the Year award
New board members Norm Hodgins and Reggie Berry with the rest of the board.
Thanks to Ear Q for providing our former players with testing and hearing aids if needed.
CAREER TRANSITION
Football Players Health Study at Harvard University
Partnering with Former Players: A Collaboration

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Learn more about the Football Players Health Study
The Football Players Health Study at Harvard University is now the largest study of its kind. This study will benefit former players for generations to come, let's keep the momentum going! To learn more about the study, click on the video above to watch and go to the website:
http://footballplayershealth.harvard.edu.
BUSINESS
8 FINANCIAL DECISIONS YOU’LL REGRET FOREVER
Financial regrets. We’ve all had a few. But there’s a big difference between making an impulse purchase that you second-guess the morning after and making a major decision about your money that could haunt you for a lifetime.
 
We reached out to dozens of financial planners and personal-finance experts for their views on some of the most consequential mistakes people can make with their money. We also offer advice on fixing these mistakes — or avoiding them altogether — so you’re not left ruing the day when you blew your budget, wiped out your savings or otherwise sabotaged your financial future. Take a look.
 
1. Borrowing from your 401(k)

Taking a loan from your 401(k) can be tempting. After all, it’s your money. As long as your plan sponsor permits borrowing, you’ll usually have five years to pay it back with interest.
 
But short of an emergency, tapping your 401(k) is a bad idea for many reasons. According to John Sweeney, executive vice president for retirement and investment strategies at Fidelity Investments, you’re likely to reduce or suspend new contributions during the period you’re repaying the loan. That means you’re short-changing your retirement account for months or even years and sacrificing employer matches. You’re also missing out on the investment growth from the missed contributions and the cash that was borrowed.
 
Keep in mind, too, that you’ll be paying the interest on that 401(k) loan with after-tax dollars — then paying taxes on those funds again when retirement rolls around. And if you leave your job, the loan usually must be paid back within 60 days. Otherwise, it’s considered a distribution and taxed as income.
 
Before borrowing from a 401(k), explore other loan options. College tuition, for instance, can be covered with student loans and PLUS loans for parents. Major home repairs can be financed with a home-equity line of credit.
 
2. Claiming Social Security early

You’re entitled to start taking benefits at 62, but you probably shouldn’t. Most financial planners recommend waiting at least until your full retirement age – currently 66 and gradually rising to 67 for those born after 1959 – before tapping Social Security. Waiting until 70 can be even better.
 
Let’s say your full retirement age, the point at which you would receive 100% of your benefit amount, is 66. If you claim at 62, your monthly check will be reduced by 25% for the rest of your life. But hold off until age 70 and you’ll get a 32% boost in benefits – 8% a year for four years – thanks to delayed retirement credits. (Claiming strategies can differ for couples, widows and divorced spouses.)
 
“If you can live off your portfolio for a few years to delay claiming, do so,” says Natalie Colley, a financial analyst at Francis Financial in New York City. “Where else will you get guaranteed returns of 8% from the market?” Alternatively, stay on the job longer, if feasible, or start a side gig to help bridge the financial gap. There are plenty of interesting ways to earn extra cash these days.
 
3. Paying the minimum on credit cards

Americans’ plastic addiction is taking a toll on their bottom lines. The average household with debt owes $15,762 on credit cards, according to personal finance website NerdWallet.com.
 
“It can take years and years and years to potentially pay off that credit card debt with the amount of mounting interest costs,” says H. Kent Baker, professor of finance at the Kogod School of Business at American University, “especially if one continues to charge more and more and more.”

For more click here

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HEALTH
Exercise Slows Brain Aging By 10 Years
Alice Park @aliceparkny

Being more active can be an effective way to combat memory and cognitive problems

We know that exercise is good for the body and the brain. But actually being physically active, at least on a regular basis, isn’t always easy.
For days when you just don’t want to break a sweat, there’s new motivation in the form of scientific evidence: physical activity can slow brain aging by as much as 10 years, reports a new study published in the journal Neurology.
It’s among the first studies to actually put a number on how beneficial exercise can be for the brain. The researchers asked a group of 1,228 men and women of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds living in Manhattan about their regular exercise habits. They also answered questions that tested their cognitive abilities, including their memory, organization, reasoning and thinking speed. Five years later, they performed the same tests on about half of the study group.

People who reported doing more physical activity showed higher scores on cognitive tests—consistent with previous studies linking more exercise to better brain health. But when the researchers adjusted for the effect that factors like high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease can have on brain function, the link disappeared. Conditions like these could impair blood flow to the brain and therefore compromise cognitive functions, says Dr. Clinton Wright, associate professor of neurology and public health sciences at University of Miami and senior author of the study. “That suggests that people with low physical activity levels also had a greater burden of those risk factors,” he says.

He and his colleagues then focused just on people in the study who didn’t have these blood flow risk factors, and compared their cognitive scores at the beginning and end of the study. They found similar trends showing that people who exercise more had higher cognitive scores, while those who were less physically active tended to have lower scores. This time, even after accounting for the contribution of possible confounding factors, they found that this trend remained strong in two areas in particular: thinking speed and memory of specific past events.

They also found that people who exercised less showed sharper declines in their cognitive scores than people who were more active. The drops were equivalent to the declines found during normal aging over about 10 years, they concluded.

The data doesn’t prove that exercise can actually reverse or prevent a slowdown in higher level thinking skills. But it does suggest that physical activity may help people with blood flow issues to the brain, such as stroke patients, maintain their cognitive status. Wright is already studying such a group of patients who will wear activity monitors and be randomly assigned to a physical exercise program or not to see whether there is any difference in their test scores over time.

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THE TRUST CORNER

EVENTS
I Am The Trust
I AM THE TRUST
Listen to former players who have used our services talk about their experiences with our partners and programs.
Duration: 3:58

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To learn more about the transition offerings of The Trust, visit their website.

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We are "One Team", built around a fraternity of former NFL Players who are aligned, connected and engaged, working together in life beyond football.

800-372-2000 x132

Nolan Harrison III, MBA
Senior Director

Dee Becker
Assistant Director

Lorenzo Kaufman
Senior Manager

Amber Edwards
Membership Services Coordinator

Garrett Wooddell
Administration

NFLPA National Office

1133 20th Street NW
Washington, DC 20036

Office Hours
Monday - Friday
9:00am - 5:30pm EST

800-372-2000
Free Lifetime Membership
Please update your contact information  to earn your free lifetime membership and to learn more about what the Former Player Services Department offers our players. Renew your membership online through your profile page on NFLPA.com. 

Thank you for your commitment to the union who has fought for, and will continue to fight for, our rare and special fraternity. You can also call Membership Services at 202-756-9165 if you have any membership or internet questions.

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Updated NFLPA FPSD Resource Book!
The new resource book with information on NFLPA Former Player Services, The Trust, the PAF and other important resources is now available to view on your smart phone and tablets. Click this link for easy access. 
Player Emergency Help
NFL Get Help Hotline
877-506-0078
NFLLifeline.org
Upcoming Events
Health, Career, Education and Lifestyle Programs for Former Players
866-725-0063
info@playerstrust.com
Bahati VanPelt | Executive Director
www.PlayersTrust.com

Benefits Department

Available to answer player benefits and insurance questions.

800-372-2000 x155
Miki Yaras-Davis | Sr. Director
Bethany Marshall | Director
Chris Smith | Asst. Director
Adora Williams | Sr. Manager
Brian Francis | Coordinator

Professional Athletes Foundation

Gene Upshaw Players Assistance Trust (PAT)
Helping players  in need.


800-372-2000 x166

Andre Collins | Executive Director

Tyrone Allen | Director

Caryl Banks | Manager

Leslie Isler | Coordinator

www.yourPAF.com
Former players can sign up to receive a questionnaire by clicking here.
Monetary grants for qualified vested former players experiencing hardships.
800-635-4625

NFL Player Benefits Office

Baltimore, MD
NFL Benefits Office for T&P, Disability, Plan 88, pension, second career, annuity and other benefits filing.
800-638-3186

Former Player Life Improvement Plan

Joint replacement, discount prescription card, assisted living and more.
800-NFL-GOAL
Off the Field is the national football player wives association 
Click HERE for more information on Off The Field Players' Wives Association

Membership Rewards

ONE TEAM Shop is the official online store of the NFLPA, and features name and number product for EVERY current player.  Former players be sure to check the Member Benefits section of NFLPA.com for your 30% discount code.
Former player members receive a 20% discount on purchases at NFLShop and 877-NFL-SHOP
Links Unlimited provides 20% to former player members.
Save 40-50% through Callaway Golf's VIP Program. Email your name and email address to formerplayers@nflpa.com. We will set up your online account so you can begin shopping immediately.
Union Plus is brought to you by Union Privilege, established by the AFL-CIO to provide consumer benefits to members and retirees of participating labor unions. Learn More

Transition Resources

Featured Partners

Athlife provides assistance to former players with all aspects of their education goals and helps players develop degree completion plans that allow flexibility to not return to campus or transfer. 

All former players are eligible with an NFLPA Former Player Membership. (Former players with 2+ credited seasons are eligible through The Trust.)

To access the membership benefits of Athlfe, please call:
(202) 756-9132.
The YMCA believes in strengthening individuals and communities. With a presence in 10,000 neighborhoods across the country, the Y has the reach and ability to help you transition to life off the playing field.

All former players are eligible with an NFLPA Former Player Membership. (Former players with 2+ credited seasons are eligible through The Trust.)

To access the free YMCA membership, call today:  
(202) 212-6188

Health Partners

Mayo Clinic would like to reach out to invite former player members to receive a proactive comprehensive heart health evaluation at one of their locations.  Schedule an appointment by contacting Elva Ortiz (Program Coordinator) at hearthealth@mayo.edu or call 480-301-8216
If you and your family do not have health insurance, the NFLPA is proud to recommend Working America Health Care.  In collaboration with GoHealth, Working America Health Care offers you:
  • information about health care law
  • an easy way to shop for health insurance
  • the lowest rates available
Don't sit on the bench and miss out on this unique opportunity.

Call 800-907-8683 or visit the NFLPA specific website.

Business Mentoring

With over 13,000 volunteers in 347 chapters, SCORE has the expertise you need to succeed.

Use the Chapter Locator to find a SCORE office near you and request a free face to face mentoring meeting.

Education

The NFLPA has partnered with Penn State World Campus to support the educational needs of NFLPA members. The World Campus offers more than 100 accredited graduate degrees, undergraduate degrees, certificates, and minors.

Penn State ranked as the No. 1 institution in the nation for producing the best-prepared, most well-rounded graduates who are most able to succeed once hired, according to a survey by The Wall Street Journal.

Penn State World Campus offers NFLPA members a tuition reduction benefit for all degree and certificate programs. Learn more about how you can receive a top-quality education, completed at your convenience, from one of the world’s most renowned universities. 
The NFLPA has partnered with the University of Phoenix to provide former player members with educational opportunities that can provide you with skills and knowledge to help you excel.  To learn more , visit our University of Phoenix member page.
American Public University (APU_ and the NFLPA have teamed up to offer former player members flexible and affordable online degree programs and career services.

Former player members also have access to a variety of career services, including career coaching, mentoring and networking opportunities, as well as university-sponsored job boards and career fairs.

Visit APU's former player website for more information.

Social Networks

Connect on Instagram
NFLPAFormerPlayers

NFLPA.com

Don't forget to visit the NFL Players Association's website for updates and information about all players. One Team!
Website
Facebook
Twitter
Link
Google Plus
Copyright © 2015 NFLPA, All rights reserved.

Contact Us

NFL PLAYERS ASSOCIATION
1133 20th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20036
www.nflpa.com

 
EDITOR
Nolan Harrison III, MBA
Senior Director, Former Player Services
NFL Player 1991 - 2000
nolan.harrison@nflpa.com
Twitter: @nolanharrison74


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